What it Means to Be a Teammate

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What it Means to Be a Teammate

 

As the saying goes, “There’s no ‘I’ in team.”  The inferred meaning definitely rings true for a cheerleader. When individual mistakes have the potential to derail the success of an entire squad, nothing is more important than teamwork.

Many of the qualities that athletes develop on their journey to becoming a great teammate will impact their “future-self” tremendously. Here are 12 valuable reminders of what it means to be a great teammate:

A great teammate develops real relationships.

Success doesn’t necessarily mean winning but rather the enjoyment had throughout the season. Get to know your teammates off the sidelines and the competition floor.

A great teammate is willing to play any role on the team.

Having a “team-first” attitude with the will to fulfill any role necessary enables the team’s best chance of being successful.

A great teammate gives maximum effort.

Never give less than your best. As cliché as it sounds, hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

A great teammate works hard to improve.

Always strive to be better than yesterday. After perfecting a stunt or tumbling pass, set a new goal; reach higher, and get to work.

A great teammate leads by example.

Actions speak louder than words: show up early; leave late; listen to the coach; stay engaged, and be mentally present 100% of the time.

A great teammate is always prepared.

By ensuring you’re prepared, you prove dependability to your coaches and teammates. Be stretched, warmed-up, caught-up on homework, and ready to put your best foot forward each day.

A great teammate understands their strengths and weaknesses.

 

Self-evaluate your abilities and determine strengths to utilize and weaknesses to improve. Personal responsibility and the willingness to learn and grow are valuable traits both in and out of cheer.

A great teammate consistently shows a positive and energetic attitude.

Consistency is key. A great teammate is positive, full of energy and enthusiasm, regardless of the situation. Positivity will transfer to the other members of your team, but, adversely, negativity will do the same.

A great teammate is willing to accept feedback from the team.

Regardless of whether or not you agree, always hear out your teammates. Be willing to learn and accept advice from your peers. Over the course of a lifetime, the knowledge you can gain from those around you could be exponential.

A great teammate supports others when they are struggling.

If you notice a teammate feeling down, take a few moments to check on them and build them up. Showing compassion and empathy goes a long way. You never know what someone may be battling, so be kind and understanding.

A great teammate never places blame or finds excuses.

Leaders (and great teammates) accept responsibility.  Adversity is inevitable; handle conflict by holding yourself accountable, and focus on what you can do to help the team succeed.

A great teammate makes others feel valued.

Be a constant stream of encouragement and support. Encourage others, and you’ll see the intensity of practice, as well as your relationships, grow. The best part…? Once you start to encourage and support your teammates, your teammates will start to encourage and support you!

The best teams are made up of athletes who work together and who are willing to make sacrifices. You don’t have to be the most talented member of the team to leave the biggest impact. Being a great teammate is a mindset, not a skill.

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